EBM and Clinical Support Librarians@UCHC

A blog for medical students, faculty and librarians about their use of evidence based medicine, clinical literature, Web 2.0, sources and search strategies

Category Archives: Educational Sites

Teaching & Learning in Medicine, Research Methodology, Biostatistics: Show Me the Evidence (Part 4): Causality, Airplanes and GIDEON

As accident re-enactments go, this one is pretty Riveting

Links courtesy of NJ.com and Exosphere3D – All rights reserved – Copyright 2011

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The focus and calm of U.S. Airways Captain Chesley Sullenberger can be appreciated by listening to the audio portion of this re-enactment, as he made critical analyses – over a period of only a few minutes – on how (and where) to land a disabled aircraft sinking earthward over a densely populated area. His decisions saved 100% of the lives on board that day.

Hang out with a bunch of epidemiologists long enough and eventually the conversation while turn to Causality. They will tell you that there are some big differences in semantics between linking causation, etiology and “proof” that X exposure caused Z disease or health condition. When I looked up the terms “causation” and “causality” (on Google) there were major sidetracks, such as WBA (Why-Because-Analysis) as in, Why did the airplane crash? Why did the reactor experience a meltdown?

Why? From the viewpoint of a physician, an engineer or an epidemiologist… because of X-Y-Z.  

X-Y-Z could be bird strikes, human error, engine failure, weather conditions, crazed people bearing guns, lack of fuel or a thousand other accidents waiting to happen. Often the causes can be identified. Sometimes one can only attribute unanticipated events to gauzy, fuzzy concepts such as “it was a one in a million chance” or “this was God’s will”,  “causes unknown” or just plain Karma. The harder (non-fuzzy) data can be applied towards improvements in systems design, development of new vaccines, engineering safety… all targeted towards avoidance of future accidents (or disease outbreaks).

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Epidemiologists save lives.  Sometimes this association accumulates slowly… as in proving associations between Exposure X and development of Disease Y decades later.  In other cases, evidence mounts up as an emergency, such as the identification of a novel virus identified as SARS in 2002.  But linking health effects of exposures over a human life-span is so much more elusive than showing evidence that birds got sucked into a jet engine at 2,500 feet (as above).

Turning to the PubMed database, a screenshot below from Medical Subject Headings List (MeSH) reveals how the term “causation” is mapped in the online thesaurus of medical indexing terms:

Image Source: NLM (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh) – All rights reserved – copyright 2011

One way to search a large database such as PubMed is to simply type in some words – for an example, Liver Cancer AND Epidemiology.  This pulls up over 18,000 retrievals…  too many (!), but by then selecting and applying standard Limit Fields such as Language, Journal Subset, Age Group, Gender and others, the retrievals can be filtered down to a more-manageable number.

A more precise way to search a large database like PubMed is to use the Medical Subject Headings list. In the example below, the term Liver Cancer was typed into the MeSH search page, which maps automatically to the preferred MeSH term — Liver Neoplasms. While this search still retrieves thousands of citation, they can be limited by selecting and applying any MeSH Subheading (or clinical qualifiers) that are appropriate to the search. These subheadings include clinical concepts such as Virology, Immunology, Genetics, Epidemiology, Transmission and 80 others.  Following is a screenshot of that type of search:

Image Source: NLM (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mesh) – All rights reserved – copyright 2011

Remember that a librarian’s idea of “causality” could be defined, in part, by the number or types of clinical subqualifiers selected (immunology, virology, epidemiology and those types of “background” concepts) to be combined with the formal MeSH term.

There are many ways to search. It helps a novice medical searcher sometimes to tell them just that: There is no one right way to search. Sounds enigmatic and it is.

Here is an example which I found recently in the medical literature, a 2010 article which discusses application of Bradford Hill criteria (listed here):

  • strength of association
  • consistency
  • specificity
  • temporality
  • biological gradient (dose-response)
  • biological plausibility
  • biological coherence
  • experimental evidence and
  • analogy

 Image: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20644061 – All rights reserved – Copyright 2011

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Those searching for practical answers about causality, transmissible agents, disease etiology, global prevalence or current treatments might want to search GIDEON (Global Infectious Disease Epidemiology Online Network), an interesting “niche” information source targeting the research requirements of epidemiologists, clinical & translational researchers, MPH students, toxicologists or anyone interested in tracking or diagnosing infectious diseases on a country- or world-wide scale (subscription required). Updated weekly, the database is produced by Gideon Informatics and hosted on the EBSCO platform.

A search for causality or epidemiology done in the resources indexed by GIDEON is quite unlike a search done in PubMed about the etiology of Liver Cancer. The producers collect, review and index factual data collected from around the globe; their data encompasses a wide and diverse group of human cultures, agricultural, societal, economic or environmental practices.

Below is a screenshot of one example of the type of data that can be searched on GIDEON: bacterium (causative agent), typhoid (identifiable infectious agent) and United States (location, recorded incidence over time):

.Finally, a screenshot of What’s New at GIDEON (May 11 2011):

Image Source: GIDEON – All rights reserved – copyright 2011


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News, Public Health, Environmental & Human Catastrophes: The World Watches Japan

Image Source: International Tsunami Information Center –  All rights reserved – copyright 2011

Life-changing events continue hard for the citizens of Japan, as the world watches them cope with multiple environmental disasters after surviving a 9.0 magnitude earthquake (a Big One) that hit near the northeast coast of the island near Honshu on Friday, Mar 11 2011.  An eyewitness filmed this video clip which illustrates with utter clarity the frightening speed and power with which the ocean wave destroyed portions of Miyako City (footage from BBC website, dated Mar 17 2011). The latest death toll shows that 10,000 perished on that day, another 12,000 are still unaccounted for ten days later.

For the estimated 500,000 survivors, the basics of human requirements are being met, but supplies are scarce.  Many are living in shelters.  It will take months to clean up the rubble, and years to restore the damage to the infrastructure. As those who lost loved ones are required to re-define their “new normal”, psychological and counseling services will be in demand.

The challenges facing officials in the Japanese government in the aftermath of the quake and tsunami started out complex and have only grown more so over last ten days. A different public health emergency for these agencies is to contain radioactive materials from being released by quake- and tsunami-damaged nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station (built in 1979), an event which has been described as one of the most serious civil nuclear accidents in history.  Protection of humans from exposure to radiation is of course the immediate concern; downstream, scientists will have a large amounts of data to collect as they examine health effects from three separate catastrophes.

Below is a map illustrating the 20km exclusion zone (12.4-mile radius) surrounding the Fukushima power facility (from BBC, published Mar 21 2011):

Image Source: BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12802335 – All rights reserved – copyright 2011

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Following is a brief selection of sources for links to specific medical information and relief efforts taking place in Japan – mainly from websites outside of the country.*

Image Source: Google Crisis Response: Japan 2011 – All rights reserved – copyright 2011

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American Public Health Association (APHA) this month is providing online free access to their 2006 field handbook, Public Health Management of Disasters: The Pocket Guide (55-page PDF).  Below is shown page 42and 43:

Image Source: APHA Disaster Guide – All rights reserved – copyright 2011

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National Library of Medicine (NLM ) produces many information resources for epidemiologists, clinicians and public health officials to use to deal with environmental disasters. Since the monies to fund these agencies is from public tax-dollars, everything on the sites from NLM is on open access, available to anyone in the world to use.  How cool is that!

First, Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET), is a gateway site from which groups of individual database can be searched.  Below is a sample search on the term “radiation“:

Image Source: NLM Toxnet – All rights reserved – copyright 2011

Another resource from NLM:  Disaster Medicine & Public Health Literature, a practical and multi-purpose website.  One example of what can be found here: A schematic describing Public Health Preparedness and Response Competency Map (Dec 2010), produced by Association of Schools of Public Health, one of the accrediting bodies for institutions offering MPH/DoctorPH degrees. Worth a look, at:

Image Source: ASPH –  All rights reserved – copyright 2011

Environmental Health & Toxicology is a wide-ranging portal from NLM. After clicking on the “health professionals” link… I found access to IUPAC (International Union of Pure & Applied Chemistry and Human Health Division) Glossary of Terms Used in Toxicology and went to a random letter (I) to take a look (below):

Image Source: NLM: IUPAC Glossary –  All rights reserved – copyright 2011

Many other quality information resources are available from the NLM Specialized Information Services Division... too many to describe, free access for anyone.

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Lastly: This 6-minute instructional video called Tsunami Teacher describes how tsunamis form, how to recognize if one is likely to take place, and testimonials from those who have survived them.  It is a basic tutorial.

An iconical, enduring image about a terrible subject: “Great Wave off Kanagawa“, a colored woodblock print by Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) is one print in a series produced between 1829 and 1833.

Image source: Wikipedia – All rights reserved – copyright 2011

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* Thanks to librarians at the National Library of Medicine, who earlier this month posted some of these websites on the MED-LIB listserv, which started the idea for this post.

Academic Libraries, News, Current Reports: Storehouses, Tool Sheds and Peripheral Brains

Returning from a blogging-break, I found several links in my email account to a variety of newly-published library-related reports or scholarly articles. Two that I enjoyed reading are referenced below.

We do not yet understand the scholarly significance of large swaths of the digital universe.”

So wrote Dan Hazen, associate librarian of collection management at Harvard College, in his 2010 article, “Rethinking Research Library Collections: A Policy Framework for Straitened Times and Beyond“, available through open access to anyone, and published in 2010 in Library Resources & Technical Services (citation link below).

I especially liked his caption “Libraries as Storehouses, Libraries as Tool Sheds”.  As a mid-career librarian, the life work of my generation have been the planners, implementers and fixers for this migration of library collections from the Real (hold it in your hand, be in the library to read it) to the Virtual (it’s online 24×7 from anywhere you are). Another central issue for research libraries also focuses on historical archiving and reliable preservation of generations of printed, and digital, collections.  The excerpt below from Dr. Hazen’s article summarizes such concerns much more eloquently than I can:

” The mass of information resources now available on the Web, many of them free, is fundamentally changing the library community’s thinking about collections….  Links to freely available digital content, meta-search capabilities that cut across products and platforms, and local aggregations of electronic resources, will all play a growing role in libraries’ collections and content strategies. This in turn will also reduce the physicality of library holdings and alter the functionalities of their spaces.  But we need to go further.  Three aspects of Web-based content require close attention. First, the search engines that today allow users to find materials on the Web are neither transparent nor fully revealing of useful content in predictable ways. Google Scholar, for example, relies upon opaque search algorithms and relevance rankings that appear not to fully exploit the wealth of standards-based metadata that libraries routinely provide. But most libraries do little better, investing their cataloged resources with robust metadata that our discovery tools rarely handle well. Second, sources on the Web—whether websites themselves or the  data, images, objects, and documents embedded within them—are notoriously unstable. Content is added, changed, and removed; links shift around and disappear. Scholarship relies on enduring access to constant content, a goal which remains elusive in the digital domain. Capture, curation, and digital preservation are all implicated in this conundrum.  Third, dispersed and disparate Web content requires tools that can work across amalgamated sets of sources in predictable and repeatable ways. Some of the uses are well-understood, while others reflect a new realm of inquiry that includes text mining, pattern recognition, visualization, and simulation. The needs are perhaps most pressing around massive accumulations of raw data. Libraries, working together and also with academics and information technologists, have an evolving role in creating and supporting the tools that will enable students and scholars to take full advantage of the digital world. It is not yet clear whether lead roles can or should be pre-ordained: arrangements that embody flexibility and contingency seem most likely to succeed. “

Source: Library Resources & Technical Services – Vol.  54(2), pages 115-121. (2010)

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Staff at OCLC collaborated on a report published in 2010, entitled Perceptions of Libraries 2010: Context and Community .  The 59-page report is an update of a 2005 edition, and is available free online from this link. Below is an excerpt from the Conclusion:

Love for librarians remains. Like the library brand, it grew stronger. It seems that self-sufficient information consumers still appreciate expertise and a passion for learning—but they like it best on their time, with their tools. It’s cool to ask an expert—online. It was not cool to ask a librarian for help in 1950 (Public Library Inquiry, 1950); it’s still not cool. Many more perceptions and attitudes have remained the same for the information consumer in the last five years. She still wants to self-serve and self-navigate the info sphere. She discovered the benefits of surfing the Internet by 2003 and, by 2010, was using more powerful tools. She is creating her own apps. She still knows good information when she sees it. She takes her information habits, and perceptions, with her as she ages. While she may be a bit less impressed with online information resources as they have become commonplace, nothing has yet replaced the value and speed of a search engine. And, her personal device connects her to a network where she can share the knowledge gained. She shares her info sphere with older information consumers but does not welcome information gates or gatekeepers. Her advice for libraries: more hours, more content, more computers and of course—more books.


And any librarian in 2011 would not be surprised by this chart (also from the OCLC report):

Source: Both excerpts from OCLChttp://www.oclc.org/reports/2010perceptions/2010perceptions_all.pdf – All rights reserved – Copyright 2011

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* I prefer to believe that our users still have a need for reference librarians who are seasoned … a term much preferable to “old” (!).  However canny, shrewd and wise will also win a smile from those behind that desk.

Just like Dr. Rose, librarians have large peripheral brains too!

News, A Look Back: Happy New Year and Picks for Best Posts

First:  Best wishes for a Happy and Healthy New Year 2011 to everyone! 

Since I have been writing this blog (which began in July 2007), I have yet to assemble a list of  “favorite posts” from the backlist.  The first week of a brand New Year seems like a good time to offer up this collection.

Here’s a list of top picks from the EBM & Clinical Support Librarians@UCHC blog (in no particular order):

  • Digital Natives (Jun 12 2008) compares the learning environment of today’s graduate students with those from my generation (i.e., circa 1970’s).
  • A continuing series called Show Me The EvidencePart 1 is linked here. Part 2 – go here.  And Part 3 (which has received the most hits over time) link is here.

That’s a compilation to start out the New Year, folks – and thanks for reading this blog.

 


 

News, Clinical Resources, iPhone Apps: FirstConsult

Here’s some good news!  On Nov 6 2010, Elsevier Health, producer of the MD Consult/FirstConsult database, announced their free FirstConsult app for iPhone, iPod Touch or iPad .

UCHC Library is an institutional subscriber to the MD Consult database, which enables any registered library user to access the First Consult database via their mobile device.  If you haven’t used FirstConsult before, it is a clinical point-of-care resource designed for busy clinicians who need fast answers in a “wherever, whenever” wireless environment.  Below is a screenshot of  First Consult apps page from iTunes:

Source: http://www.mdconsult.com/php/227775087-4/homepage – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010

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Here are instructions on how to make it work on your iPhone/iPad:

1.       If you have not previously set up an account with MD Consult, first you’ll need to create one (which is free and quick).  Go to http://library.uchc.edu, then click on Databases, then scroll down to the MD Consult link.

The “Create Account” button is in the upper right-hand corner. (Without this step, your free FirstConsult app will only work for 60 days).  See the screenshot below:

Image Source: http://www.mdconsult.com/php/227775087-4/homepage – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010

2.      Next, using your mobile device, log into your MD Consult account.  Then go to the iPhone App Store.  Download the FirstConsult app into your device.  Medical topics download occurs automatically; you should budget 30 minutes for the initial data downloading.

If you have any questions or problems with getting this to work, please call UCHC Library Computer Education Center staff at 860-679-3772.

News, Information Seeking Behaviors, Research: Project Information Literacy surveys College Students

Wow…  Been away from blogging for so long I’m relieved to remember how it works! 8) *

Health literacy is a key focus for librarians who interact frequently with patients looking for information about their own health issues.

Larger, more universal information-seeking behaviors and lifelong learning strategies are topics of ongoing interest to two information scientists at the University of Washington Information School who started Project Information Literacy (PIL) in 2008. Lead researcher Alison P. Head is the Co-Director of the project along with Michael Eisenberg, professor at the iSchool. Funding is provided by the MacArthur Foundation.  Here is a description of the scope of PIL from the home page:

Project Information Literacy is a study “across” different types of campuses (community colleges, state colleges, and public and private universities) from different geographic areas in the U.S.  Our goal is to help fill in some of the “missing pieces” of the information literacy puzzle and provide data that helps answer some of the following questions:  1) How do early adults (in their own words) put their information literacy competencies into practice in learning environments in a digital age, regardless of how they may measure up to standards for being information literate? 2) With the proliferation of online resources and new technologies, how do early adults recognize the information needs they may have and in turn, how do they locate, evaluate, select and use the information that is needed? 3) How can teaching the critical and information literacy skills that are needed to enable lifelong learning be more effectively transferred to college students? “

The newest progress report from PIL was published Nov 1 2010 and may be of interest to anyone who uses a real or digital library in 2010, as it describes findings from a large survey of undergraduate students from around the U.S., asking 22 standard questions about how they plan, execute and assess their research efforts for required course work.

It is 72 pages in length, and entitled “Truth Be Told: How College Students Evaluate and Use Information in the Digital Age“, available free and online for anyone to read. Following is an excerpt from the introduction:

In this [2010] report, we continue our investigation by asking how students evaluate information and use information once they have found it. What difficulties do students encounter with course-related and everyday life research from start to finish? We collected data to answer these questions by administering a student survey in the spring of 2010 to 112,844 undergraduates. Our findings are based on a collective sample of 8,353 students enrolled at 25 U.S. colleges and universities “.

Source: http://projectinfolit.org/pdfs/PIL_Fall2010_Survey_FullReport1.pdf

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I was interested to read these “background” questions that Dr. Head and Dr. Eisenberg wanted to learn more about:

Source: http://projectinfolit.org/pdfs/PIL_Fall2010_Survey_FullReport1.pdf

Their work is of practical value to anyone who uses – or works in – an academic library.

Also see a video about Project Information Literacy on YouTube, at this link.

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*My daughter told me to stop using Smiley Faces, but that “it’s OK because I don’t know any better”.

 

 

 

News, Patient Education, Teaching & Learning in Medicine: October is Health Literacy Month

 

October is National Medical Librarians Month in the U.S.

The theme for 2010 is Health Literacy

Here is a screenshot of the poster created by Medical Library Association for this event:

Image credit: Medical Library Association – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010

Health science librarians are in a unique position to work with patients and their families who seek current, credible and authoritative medical information in order to learn more about their recent diagnosis, review options for choosing treatments, or to anticipate changes in their lifestyle or living situations after treatment has ended (as examples).

Medical Library Association (MLA), a nonprofit educational organization with 5,000 members worldwide, has devoted time and care over the past decade to develop websites and resource guides specifically targeted at training librarians who provide information services to patients or family members. Their Health Information Literacy page can be viewed at http://www.mlanet.org/resources/healthlit/

One of the larger special interest sections sponsored by MLA is Consumer and Patient Information Section (or CAPHIS). A related program directed by MLA staff is the Consumer Health Information initiative, and in 2007, the association created a formal certificate program in that specialty for information professionals.

Open to everyone on the MLA website are topic pages about educational resources. Here are two examples: Resources for Health Consumers and Deciphering Medspeak which links to medical terminology handouts (in English or Spanish languages), online medical dictionary, a prescription shorthand guide and a list of the “Top Ten Most Useful Medical Websites” for patients.

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For those pursuing research on strategies to address Low Health Literacy, Health Disparities or Health of Minority Populations, some valuable step-savers are available on the PubMed Special Queries” which provide links to pre-formulated, highly specific search statements (or search queries) that can be run singly in PubMed or combined with other relevant subject searches.

Below are screenshots from two Special Queries websites: Health Literacy and for Health Disparities & Minority Health Populations

and

Image credit(s): National Library of Medicine – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010

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Other teaching or service organizations that offer patient-centered tutorials, podcasts or written information addressing disparities in health care delivery can be found on this very brief list:

  • From a workshop in 2008 sponsored by Society for General Internal Medicine (SGIM), read a 3-page handout on teaching “Health Literacy for the Clinician Educator“at this link. There are many useful links in the bibliography section of this report.

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Finally: In May 2010, a 73-page report detailing a National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy was announced by the U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Resources, Division of Health Literacy. Following is an excerpt from that HHS website, explaining this public health initiative:

Health literacy is the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. Limited health literacy affects people of all ages, races, incomes, and education levels, but the impact of limited health literacy disproportionately affects lower socioeconomic and minority groups. “
” It affects people’s ability to search for and use health information, adopt healthy behaviors, and act on important public health alerts. Limited health literacy is also associated with worse health outcomes and higher costs….   ”
” This report contains seven goals that will improve health literacy and suggests strategies for achieving them: Develop and disseminate health and safety information that is accurate, accessible, and actionable ; promote changes in the health care system that improve health information, communication, informed decision-making, and access to health services ; incorporate accurate, standards-based and developmentally appropriate health and science information and curricula in child care and education through the university level ; support and expand local efforts to provide adult education, English language instruction, and culturally and linguistically appropriate health information services in the community ; build partnerships, develop guidance, and change policies ; increase basic research and the development, implementation, and evaluation of practices and interventions to improve health literacy and increase the dissemination and use of evidence-based health literacy practices and interventions“.
Text Source: http://www.health.gov/communication/HLActionPlan/ – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010

Clinical Tutorials, Teaching & Learning in Medicine: That Old Krebs Cycle, with Singing

I apologize for the lack of blog-posts this month… it’s been pretty busy around here.

Today’s post is about metabolic pathways, which the first-year students are deep into studying this month. Here is a link to a pretty illustration which was found on Wikipedia:

Image Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Metabolic_pathways – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010

Each year in PBL, I struggle to re-remember facts about biochemistry, cellular signaling and metabolism including steps in the Krebs cycle*. (Why? Because I never took biochemistry.) Two years ago, I found the illustration below so useful that I decided to post it on the blog for the second time!

Image Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krebs_cycle – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010
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Next, a small joke: WWSD (or, what would Setlow do)? He could sing along to this Krebs Cycle song, found on ScienceGroove.com.

Image Source: http://www.science-groove.org/Now/Krebs.html – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010
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Publisher McGraw-Hill has placed some content from their textbook Anatomy & Physiology (7th edition) online for free, including this tutorial and quiz titled “How the Krebs Cycle Works“.  After you take the quiz, relax by working a few of their Crossword Puzzles:

Image Source:  http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072507470/student_view0/chapter25/crossword_puzzles.html – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010
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Salman Khan founded a non-profit group, The Khan Academy, with the goal of providing high quality free online educational materials to anyone in the world.  This year, their collection of videos about Science, Math, Humanities, History, Finance and other academic subjects has grown to 1,800. A 10-minute video describing the educational content is here: Khan Academy.

Found on their ScienceBiology category: a 13-minute lecture describing the ATP (adenosine-triphosphate) process.

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On YouTube, author Faxe14011991 has posted this series of short animations/tutorials on cellular mechanisms, each of which is less than two minutes in length:

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Finally, a video found on YouTube called Cellular Respiration (hey there Delilah)

Image Source: http://YouTube.com – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010

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* Dr. Krebs was a Nobel Prize laureate.  Read the following text, found on the nobelprize.org page: ” The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1953 was divided equally between Hans Adolf Krebs for his discovery of the citric acid cycle, and Fritz Albert Lipmann for his discovery of co-enzyme A and its importance for intermediary metabolism.

The Friday Post #52: Medical Students, Video: Tips on How to Survive Medical School

Welcome back, everyone!  This is the Friday Post #52 for Aug 27, 2010.

The area in the pink box (below) has been the focus of instructional activities this week:

Image source: http://library.uchc.edu – All rights reserved – copyright 2010

August is a challenging month for academic reference librarians.  This week at UCHC, an interactive instructional session for first year medical and dental students (140 of them) was our main event. In 2009, the reference librarians presented a mock PBL case, written with a fourth year student who narrated the case while the librarians linked to the databases on the overhead screen in one of the large teaching auditoriums.  As each clinical scenario was described in the case, librarians linked into an assortment of resources.

This year, the 90-minute instructional session was more interactive. Everyone was handed an electronic clicker (aka audience response system) to use to respond to our librarian-questions which were interspersed between live demonstrations of PubMed, Lexi-Comp, 3-D Tooth Atlas, ADAM (Interactive Anatomy) and others.

Their new laptops also came in handy as the students quickly tried a “test run” on each of the resources. The live interactive feedback from this group was something new to try in 2010, and it was both fun and instructive. Although perhaps next year we will skip the video procedure showing the skin punch biopsy… when it is projected onto a 24 ft. square overhead, it’s just way too graphic for the first week of medical school (LOL).

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The Girl with the Blue Stethoscope (a fourth-year medical student and blogger from Australia) began a series in July 2010 titled “How to Survive Medical School.  For the members of the Class of 2014 this should be pretty much essential reading.

Her first installment was “How To Survive Medical School Part 1: Friends“.  The second installment:  How To Survive Medical School Part 2: Ask For Help. Thank you, Girl with the Blue Stethoscope… I’m looking forward to the next installment!

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Then this: Tufts University medical students raise the bar with this video for – and about – first year medical students called 99 Problems til First Years Done!

Video source: http://youtube.com – All rights reserved – copyright 2010

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That’s the Friday Post #52 for Aug 27, 2010, folks.  Enjoy a summer weekend!

News, Students, Technologies: Welcoming a New Class

As those of us in the library begin to meet our newest Class of 2014 medical, dental and doctoral students who have arrived at UCHC this week (and who were likely born in 1988), I am reminded of the Beloit College Mindset List, just published this month.  Read it here: http://www.beloit.edu/mindset/2014.php

Here is an excerpt from the intro to the 12th edition:  “These students [born in 1992] will be armed with iPhones and BlackBerries, on which making a phone call will be only one of many, many functions they will perform. They will now be awash with a computerized technology that will not distinguish information and knowledge. So it will be up to their professors to help them.  A generation accustomed to instant access will need to acquire the patience of scholarship. They will discover how to research information in books and journals and not just on-line.”

Folllowing are a few statements from the current list, reflecting on the formative environment of the newest crop of college freshman:

  • ” DNA fingerprinting and maps of the human genome have always existed.
  • ” Leno and Letterman have always been trading insults on opposing networks.
  • ” Unless they found one in their grandparents’ closet, they have never seen a carousel of Kodachrome slides.
  • ” Computers have never lacked a CD-ROM disk drive
  • ” The first home computer they probably touched was an Apple II or Mac II; they are now in a museum.
  • ” The nation has never approved of the job Congress is doing. “

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Post Script…   Readers, this new WordPress theme is called Twenty Ten.
What do you think of the new blog design? 8)