EBM and Clinical Support Librarians@UCHC

A blog for medical students, faculty and librarians about their use of evidence based medicine, clinical literature, Web 2.0, sources and search strategies

Tag Archives: Consumer Health

News, Patient Education, Teaching & Learning in Medicine: October is Health Literacy Month

 

October is National Medical Librarians Month in the U.S.

The theme for 2010 is Health Literacy

Here is a screenshot of the poster created by Medical Library Association for this event:

Image credit: Medical Library Association – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010

Health science librarians are in a unique position to work with patients and their families who seek current, credible and authoritative medical information in order to learn more about their recent diagnosis, review options for choosing treatments, or to anticipate changes in their lifestyle or living situations after treatment has ended (as examples).

Medical Library Association (MLA), a nonprofit educational organization with 5,000 members worldwide, has devoted time and care over the past decade to develop websites and resource guides specifically targeted at training librarians who provide information services to patients or family members. Their Health Information Literacy page can be viewed at http://www.mlanet.org/resources/healthlit/

One of the larger special interest sections sponsored by MLA is Consumer and Patient Information Section (or CAPHIS). A related program directed by MLA staff is the Consumer Health Information initiative, and in 2007, the association created a formal certificate program in that specialty for information professionals.

Open to everyone on the MLA website are topic pages about educational resources. Here are two examples: Resources for Health Consumers and Deciphering Medspeak which links to medical terminology handouts (in English or Spanish languages), online medical dictionary, a prescription shorthand guide and a list of the “Top Ten Most Useful Medical Websites” for patients.

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For those pursuing research on strategies to address Low Health Literacy, Health Disparities or Health of Minority Populations, some valuable step-savers are available on the PubMed Special Queries” which provide links to pre-formulated, highly specific search statements (or search queries) that can be run singly in PubMed or combined with other relevant subject searches.

Below are screenshots from two Special Queries websites: Health Literacy and for Health Disparities & Minority Health Populations

and

Image credit(s): National Library of Medicine – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010

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Other teaching or service organizations that offer patient-centered tutorials, podcasts or written information addressing disparities in health care delivery can be found on this very brief list:

  • From a workshop in 2008 sponsored by Society for General Internal Medicine (SGIM), read a 3-page handout on teaching “Health Literacy for the Clinician Educator“at this link. There are many useful links in the bibliography section of this report.

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Finally: In May 2010, a 73-page report detailing a National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy was announced by the U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Resources, Division of Health Literacy. Following is an excerpt from that HHS website, explaining this public health initiative:

Health literacy is the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. Limited health literacy affects people of all ages, races, incomes, and education levels, but the impact of limited health literacy disproportionately affects lower socioeconomic and minority groups. “
” It affects people’s ability to search for and use health information, adopt healthy behaviors, and act on important public health alerts. Limited health literacy is also associated with worse health outcomes and higher costs….   ”
” This report contains seven goals that will improve health literacy and suggests strategies for achieving them: Develop and disseminate health and safety information that is accurate, accessible, and actionable ; promote changes in the health care system that improve health information, communication, informed decision-making, and access to health services ; incorporate accurate, standards-based and developmentally appropriate health and science information and curricula in child care and education through the university level ; support and expand local efforts to provide adult education, English language instruction, and culturally and linguistically appropriate health information services in the community ; build partnerships, develop guidance, and change policies ; increase basic research and the development, implementation, and evaluation of practices and interventions to improve health literacy and increase the dissemination and use of evidence-based health literacy practices and interventions“.
Text Source: http://www.health.gov/communication/HLActionPlan/ – All rights reserved – Copyright 2010
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News, Public Health, Disease Prevention: Saturday, June 27 is National HIV Testing Day

Saturday, June 27 2009 is National HIV Testing Day

HIVTest.org

Photo credit: http://www.hivtest.org – All rights reserved – Copyright 2009

An annual event co-sponsored by the National Association of People With AIDS (NAPWA) and Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), this public health promotional effort encourages sexually-active Americans to be tested each year for infection with the HIV virus or other sexually transmitted diseases.

A separate CDC website at HIVTest.org allows a person to type in their individual zip-code or city/state location which will then bring up a directory of local sites where testing services will be available on Saturday.

Another means of finding local test site information is to call this toll-free phone number:   1-800-CDC-INFO (or 1-800-232-4636).

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A recently published report in MMWRVol. 58 (24);661-665 (June 26 2009) recaps the ill-effects of “Late HIV Testing in 34 States, 1996-2005”.

Here is an excerpt from that report – and one which represents a very sobering statistic for any epidemiologist: Current estimates suggest that 21% of HIV infections in the United States are undiagnosed.”

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CDC sponsors a related consumer-health information source page called “Nine and A Half Minutes” (for the estimated frequency of new STD infections among Americans).  Here is a screenshot of that site:

HIVfactsPhoto credit: http://www.hivtest.org – All rights reserved – Copyright 2009

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A 14-page HIV Testing Fact Sheet (in English or Spanish language) is available from CDC at this link.

Finally, below is a short list of other statistical or factual sites for current sexual health information:

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